FERTILITY TREATMENTS

Fertility treatments

RISKS OF ASSISTED REPRODUCTIVE TECHNOLOGIES

 

Infertility, defined as an inability to achieve a clinical pregnancy after 12-months of unprotected intercourse, affects approximately 15% of women of reproductive age. (World Health Organisation 2010) Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) is a group of procedures that involve the in vitro handling (outside of the body) of human oocytes (eggs), sperm, and/or embryos for the purposes of establishing a pregnancy. There were 71,516 ART treatment cycles reported from Australia and New Zealand in 2013. Of the 71,516 initiated cycles, 23.8% (17,054) resulted in a clinical pregnancy (positive heart beat on ultrasound) and 18.2% (12,997) in a live birth. (Macaldowie A 2015)

The risks of IVF can be divided into ‘maternal risks’ and ‘fetal risks’. Maternal risks can be further subdivided into short-term risks (or risks associated with the IVF cycle itself) and long-term risks (or potential, future risks).

 

MEDICAL FERTILITY PRESERVATION

 

There are many children, adolescents and young women and men whose fertility can be threatened by cancer or other serious diseases and by the treatment for these conditions. Medical fertility preservation refers to methods to try and protect and preserve fertility for the future, using a variety of treatment options including medicines to protect the ovary and freezing of eggs, embryos, and ovarian tissue for young women and freezing of semen, sperm and testicular tissue for young men

Ovulation Induction Summary for patients

Introduction

• Ovulation (the release of an egg from the ovary) is an essential part of fertility. Difficulties in ovulation represent the commonest reason for female subfertility.
• Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) is the commonest cause of ovulation problems. The tell tale sign of abnormal ovulation is irregular menstrual cycle length.

YOUR CHANCES OF SUCCESS WITH IVF

– A CONSUMERS GUIDE

Medical and scientific information provided and endorsed by the Australian and New Zealand Society of Reproductive Endocrinology and Infertility (ANZSREI) might not be relevant to a particular person’s circumstances and should always be discussed with that person’s own healthcare provider.  Patient Information Sheets may contain copyright or otherwise protected material. Reproduction of Information Sheets by ANZSREI Members for clinical practice is permissible. Any other use of this information (hardcopy and electronic versions) must be agreed to and approved by the ANZSREI.